hi im christine im 22 years old vet tech student i tell stuff like it is..
“My reflection in the mirror depicts a person with the worst punishment of all: a waste of life”— Brandon Novak
I love my family #family #guerra #beach #lbi

I love my family #family #guerra #beach #lbi

Posted
1 day ago
Lobsta game too strong #lobster #birthday #champagne

Lobsta game too strong #lobster #birthday #champagne

Notes
1
Posted
4 days ago
things-vet-taught-me:

sundrythings:

    The photo is of a syringe filled with euthanasia solution which is usually bright blue or neon pink in color to distinguish it from any other injectable medication. Euthanasia solution is just a barbiturate (usually pentobarbital) that is given in an excessive dosage. How does it work? Well basically it is GABA-ergic meaning it binds to GABA receptors in the CNS and potentiates their inhibitory action. Basically animals slowly go to sleep and then their brains and hearts “shut off”.
   I wanted to post this to clear up a few things about euthanasia. First of all, I am totally pro euthanasia. I think there are times when it is absolutely more humane to put an animal to sleep than to let it live in constant pain. People balk at putting animals down and applaud these no kill shelters but to me, it is worth putting down sick, old, poorly behaved animals that have little chance of being adopted and spend that money helping animals that have a better chance. That is an entire new thread in and of itself though.
   Being put to sleep does not hurt and animals don’t feel anything except the prick of the needle. I have had surgery before and imagine the sensation is much the same as being put under for that, you just slowly get more tired until you are asleep and don’t even realize it is happening. If an animal is particularly nervous we can give a sedative beforehand and this will help them calm down and relax. Some animals will take one last deep breath called an agonal breath and may tense their muscles, but they are not aware this is happening and it is just a reflex. We always warn owners that their pet may evacuate their bowls and bladders at the end and that their eyes will probably not be closed.
    If you are concerned about having a pet put to sleep, talk to your vet about it. They should have no problem discussing the entire procedure with you and telling you what to expect. As a veterinarian, we have to perform a few euthanasias a day and I think we tend to become a little numb about the entire thing. It would be far too difficult to become emotional at every one and we would suffer burn out very quickly. That being said, we still are attached to patients and a few vets I know have cried when they lose a patient they have known for years.  I always stick around after the procedure to offer hugs and to listen if needed.
    Vets do not enjoy putting animals down but at the same time we realize it is often for the best. Animals don’t understand “being alive” like we do. They cannot think “At least I am alive” and when they are sick they become stressed that they cannot move like they are supposed to or are in constant pain. Many owners want to keep animals that are unable to move on their own and can’t even defecate on their own alive with feeding tubes and catheters and I think that is the ultimate in cruelty and selfishness. It is an owner’s responsibility to know when it is time to humanely end a pet’s life and many people abuse this power.
   Before making rash decisions talk to your vet and decide what is best for your pet, not for you. Euthanasia is not a coward’s choice but that of someone very brave.

This is so important. I put my horse down about a year ago- I found him after he’d had a freak paddock accident and sustained injuries that were likely beyond repair, and his vitals were not good.
I took it one step at a time from the moment the vet arrived to treat him, to the moment he took his last agonal breath and passed away. I loved him with all my heart and soul, and I have never done something so hard in my entire life. I still cry about it and miss him every day, but I know that it was the right thing to do for him.
It’s always important to make the decision that’s best for your animal. Life will always end in death, and your animal has lived a longer life with you than it would have ever had without you. It will always be hard for you to say goodbye, but no harder than them suffering until their bodies can’t sustain it anymore.
The one thing that makes me smile from that memory was me getting up from sitting beside my horse, running after the vet as he went to leave, hugging him and saying thank you. Veterinarians have devoted their lives to protecting animal life, and it is never easy taking it away. I know that one day if a client did the same for me, it would bring me a lot of light in a dark situation xx

things-vet-taught-me:

sundrythings:

    The photo is of a syringe filled with euthanasia solution which is usually bright blue or neon pink in color to distinguish it from any other injectable medication. Euthanasia solution is just a barbiturate (usually pentobarbital) that is given in an excessive dosage. How does it work? Well basically it is GABA-ergic meaning it binds to GABA receptors in the CNS and potentiates their inhibitory action. Basically animals slowly go to sleep and then their brains and hearts “shut off”.

   I wanted to post this to clear up a few things about euthanasia. First of all, I am totally pro euthanasia. I think there are times when it is absolutely more humane to put an animal to sleep than to let it live in constant pain. People balk at putting animals down and applaud these no kill shelters but to me, it is worth putting down sick, old, poorly behaved animals that have little chance of being adopted and spend that money helping animals that have a better chance. That is an entire new thread in and of itself though.

   Being put to sleep does not hurt and animals don’t feel anything except the prick of the needle. I have had surgery before and imagine the sensation is much the same as being put under for that, you just slowly get more tired until you are asleep and don’t even realize it is happening. If an animal is particularly nervous we can give a sedative beforehand and this will help them calm down and relax. Some animals will take one last deep breath called an agonal breath and may tense their muscles, but they are not aware this is happening and it is just a reflex. We always warn owners that their pet may evacuate their bowls and bladders at the end and that their eyes will probably not be closed.

    If you are concerned about having a pet put to sleep, talk to your vet about it. They should have no problem discussing the entire procedure with you and telling you what to expect. As a veterinarian, we have to perform a few euthanasias a day and I think we tend to become a little numb about the entire thing. It would be far too difficult to become emotional at every one and we would suffer burn out very quickly. That being said, we still are attached to patients and a few vets I know have cried when they lose a patient they have known for years.  I always stick around after the procedure to offer hugs and to listen if needed.

    Vets do not enjoy putting animals down but at the same time we realize it is often for the best. Animals don’t understand “being alive” like we do. They cannot think “At least I am alive” and when they are sick they become stressed that they cannot move like they are supposed to or are in constant pain. Many owners want to keep animals that are unable to move on their own and can’t even defecate on their own alive with feeding tubes and catheters and I think that is the ultimate in cruelty and selfishness. It is an owner’s responsibility to know when it is time to humanely end a pet’s life and many people abuse this power.

   Before making rash decisions talk to your vet and decide what is best for your pet, not for you. Euthanasia is not a coward’s choice but that of someone very brave.

This is so important. I put my horse down about a year ago- I found him after he’d had a freak paddock accident and sustained injuries that were likely beyond repair, and his vitals were not good.

I took it one step at a time from the moment the vet arrived to treat him, to the moment he took his last agonal breath and passed away. I loved him with all my heart and soul, and I have never done something so hard in my entire life. I still cry about it and miss him every day, but I know that it was the right thing to do for him.

It’s always important to make the decision that’s best for your animal. Life will always end in death, and your animal has lived a longer life with you than it would have ever had without you. It will always be hard for you to say goodbye, but no harder than them suffering until their bodies can’t sustain it anymore.

The one thing that makes me smile from that memory was me getting up from sitting beside my horse, running after the vet as he went to leave, hugging him and saying thank you. Veterinarians have devoted their lives to protecting animal life, and it is never easy taking it away. I know that one day if a client did the same for me, it would bring me a lot of light in a dark situation xx

Notes
530
Posted
4 days ago

drtanner:

suicunesrider:

uneditededit:

Remember in 1993 when Jurassic Park was like…the end all, be all of special effects?

image

not gonna lie that still looks intimately real

I’m still somewhat convinced that someone sold their soul to create the special effects in Jurassic Park because that shit is over 20 years old and it still really, really holds up, better than the stuff in a lot of current movies, even.

Fucking witchcraft, man. 

(via friendlycloud)

Notes
112777
Posted
4 days ago
I miss this already #lbi #beach #nj

I miss this already #lbi #beach #nj

Notes
3
Posted
5 days ago
#chillen #beach #lbi   (at On The Beach, LBI)

#chillen #beach #lbi (at On The Beach, LBI)

Notes
2
Posted
1 week ago
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